Carita Crain

Carita Crain (and the late Mike Crain) started homeschooling their children in 1989.  (This was when Missouri had a good law, but the Crains had a place to hide their kids in their home, just in case the DFS workers visited.)  Both parents had a teaching degree but wanted to avoid the mass production of conventional school. During many special circumstances --- having one child with a disability, taking 24 x 7 care of Carita’s mother who had Alzheimer’s, losing her husband in a car wreck, and having one son suffer a Traumatic Brain Injury from that car wreck --- she has seen the faithfulness of God.  Homeschooling took on many different faces during these times, but God’s fingerprints were everywhere.

At this time, the six Crain kids are ages 19-35.  One has Williams syndrome and the others are
either currently working on a college degree or have completed one.  More important than that is the fact that they are all Christ-followers. Carita homeschooled her own kids for 24 years until the last one graduated in 2013, but she is still involved in home education. She is on the Board of St. Charles County Home Educators and has taught many workshops in keeping records, homeschooling special needs kids, homeschooling for high school, and is currently teaching ACT Prep to high school students at the SCCHE Learning Center. She assists her oldest daughter Sarah (Crain) Moeller with The Homeschool Planbook and State Histories in Light of the Cross business. Crain lives in Troy, Missouri, with some of her children, two horses, two cats, and too many goldfish.

 

 

Carita will be speaking on the following topic:

Room 339  Saturday, 12:30 pm
Homeschooling Your High School Student with Special Needs” AKA “Time to Put Away Your Cookie Cutters and Conveyor Belts
When your special needs child enters the high school years, you can follow the Missouri law and still teach what needs to be learned.  Parents will be encouraged to focus their teaching on life skills and character training.  Academics should be continued, but the child's needs and future plans should determine how far academics are pursued. 

Just as each typical child has special strengths and weaknesses, a special needs child will have certain set of skills that he/she was created for.  These will probably not be academic skills.  It is part of our responsibility
as parents of these special children to find their special talents and gifts to finish out their formal education. 

In this workshop we will also cover some of the nuts and bolts of having a child with a disability. 
Although no legal advice will be given, we will discuss special needs trusts, disability income, and other resources to help you get the help you need.

Exhibitor Workshop
Saturday, Room 360   9:00 am

The Homeschool Planbook” AKA "Real Life Record-Keeping
In 1993, 13-year-old Sarah Crain was given an assignment by
her mom--- to create a planbook for the family’s homeschool records. 
Immediately, several people in their O’Fallon, Missouri, support group wanted a
copy. Since then, The Homeschool Planbook has undergone many changes, many from
customers’ suggestions. There are now versions for elementary/middle school,
middle/high school, and planbooks for up to four students. Each has enough
pages for 52 weeks, seven days a week. These were obviously developed by
homeschoolers specifically for homeschoolers. 

In this workshop you will learn not only how to keep records
using The Homeschool Planbook, but you will also see how to creatively get in
your hours. Learning does not always require a textbook, in fact using only
books can create burnout. Carita Crain will show you how to use daily
activities as educational experiences and record them properly, for both
elementary and high school homeschooling.  Record-keeping does not have to
be a burden, and those 1000 hours do not have to burn you out!