FACTS ABOUT THE MARSH

STATE WILDLIFE AREA & NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE

Horicon Marsh is the largest freshwater cattail marsh in the United States. Located in southeast Wisconsin, this vast wetland is only one hour drive from Milwaukee and Madison. While this marsh is renown for its migrant flocks of Canada geese, it is also home to more than 305 kinds of birds which have been sighted over the years.

Due to its importance to wildlife, Horicon Marsh has been designated as a "Wetland of International Importance" and a "Globally Important Bird Area." Horicon Marsh is both a State Wildlife Area and National Wildlife Refuge. Different opportunities and restrictions apply to each area. Much of this is described in the following pages while additional information is available from the appropriate offices.

Click Here To Learn More About the State Wildlife Area

Click Here To Learn More About The National Wildlife Refuge 

ICE AGE RESERVE UNIT

The Ice Age National Scientific Reserve was established in 1964 to protect the glacial landforms and landscapes in Wisconsin. The reserve is an affiliated area of the National Park System and consists of nine units across Wisconsin. Most of these units are connected by the Ice Age Trail.  The units protect different areas of scenic and scientific value and provide all kinds of opportunities, from studying Wisconsin’s natural history at one of the interpretive centers, to hiking, camping, sightseeing and wildlife viewing.

Click Here To Learn More About Ice Age Reserve Unit 

GLOBALLY IMPORTANT BIRD AREA

Habitat destruction and degradation are the most serious threats to the survival of bird species and populations both here in Wisconsin, in other states, and in other countries.  The Important Bird Areas (IBA) program is a global initiative that links local and state conservation efforts to national and international efforts to protect essential habitat for all birds.

Click Here To Learn More About The IBA

WETLAND OF INTERNATIONAL IMPORTANCE

Wetlands are areas where water is the primary factor controlling the environment and the associated plant and animal life. They occur where the water table is at or near the surface of the land, or where the land is covered by water.

Click Here To Learn More About The Conservation of Wetlands